Nothing that we do, is done in vain. I believe, with all my soul, that we shall see triumph.
Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities
I hope that real love and truth are stronger in the end than any evil or misfortune in the world.
Charles Dickens, David Copperfield
I have been bent and broken, but — I hope — into a better shape.
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations
Let me remember how it used to be, and bring one morning back again.
Charles Dickens, David Copperfield
The sun,—the bright sun, that brings back, not light alone, but new life, and hope, and freshness to man—burst upon the crowded city in clear and radiant glory. Through costly-coloured glass and paper-mended window, through cathedral dome and rotten crevice, it shed its equal ray.
Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist
There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth.
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations
from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

My meaning simply is, that whatever I have tried to do in life, I have tried with all my heart to do well; that whatever I have devoted myself to, I have devoted myself to completely; that in great aims and in small, I have always been thoroughly in earnest.
Charles Dickens, David Copperfield
This is the one and only original manuscript of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol. The Morgan Library and Museum displays Charles Dickens’s original manuscript of A Christmas Carol in Pierpont Morgan’s historic Library until January 13, 2013. Dickens wrote his iconic tale in a six-week flurry of activity, beginning in October 1843 and ending in time for Christmas publication. He had the manuscript bound in red morocco as a gift for his solicitor, Thomas Mitton. The manuscript then passed through several owners before Pierpont Morgan acquired it in the 1890s. 




It reveals Dickens’s method of composition, allowing us to glimpse the author at work. he began writing the story in October 1843, completing it in only six weeks. His apparently contiguous pace of writing and revision was urgent but moldly confident. The interlinear revisions increase the story’s vividness: text is struck out with a continuous looping movement of the pen and replaced with more active verbs and fewer words to achieve greater concision. Dickens sent this manuscript to the printer in early December, and the book was published in time for the Christmas market. [The Morgan, 2012] (photo: yyz2nyc)

This is the one and only original manuscript of Charles Dickens’ A Christmas CarolThe Morgan Library and Museum displays Charles Dickens’s original manuscript of A Christmas Carol in Pierpont Morgan’s historic Library until January 13, 2013. Dickens wrote his iconic tale in a six-week flurry of activity, beginning in October 1843 and ending in time for Christmas publication. He had the manuscript bound in red morocco as a gift for his solicitor, Thomas Mitton. The manuscript then passed through several owners before Pierpont Morgan acquired it in the 1890s. 

It reveals Dickens’s method of composition, allowing us to glimpse the author at work. he began writing the story in October 1843, completing it in only six weeks. His apparently contiguous pace of writing and revision was urgent but moldly confident. The interlinear revisions increase the story’s vividness: text is struck out with a continuous looping movement of the pen and replaced with more active verbs and fewer words to achieve greater concision. Dickens sent this manuscript to the printer in early December, and the book was published in time for the Christmas market. [The Morgan, 2012(photo: yyz2nyc)

from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

There is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good humor.
Charles Dickens, A Christmas Carol



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I first introduced TowerBabel.com here a few months ago, and it looks like they have grown their collection of free eBooks from those great classics to include indie author published works as well.